Prevent SIM Hacking

Prevent SIM Hacking

Security Features
  • SIM Swap Protection
  • Helps Keep Financial Accounts Protected
  • Helps Keep Social Profiles Protected
  • Military Grade Protection
  • Everything is Encrypted & Classified
  • Individual Protection of $5M
  • 24/7 Concierge Support

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Plan Features & Pricing
  • $99 Unlimited Talk and Text
  • 100% Free International Roaming
  • No Hidden Fees
  • 4G Network
  • $5M Insurance Against Phone Hacks
  • Keep Your Number or Get a New One
  • 60-Day 100% Money Back Refund Guarantee

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SIM Swapping

In the crazy world that we live in, there is always something that we should be protecting us from. Everything from our identities, our credit cards, or our personal information. Something that has come recently as a part of a new scam is SIM swapping. This is done with someone’s SIM card and the personal information that is connected to that tiny card and your phone number. The actual scam part is when someone calls your phone provider pretending to be you and requests to get your phone number changed to a different SIM card. The SIM card is one that is already in their possession and from that point forward, all of your text messages and phone calls will go to that SIM card and to the scammer. You may not have any personal information going through your texts or phone calls, but your phone number is linked to a number of personal things. These can include bank accounts, social media accounts, email accounts, and just your mobile and online identity as a whole. From here the options are endless for the scammer as they now have access to everything in your life that is somewhere in the digital and online world.

If this happens to you and your phone, you will know because your phone will no longer have service and will only connect to wifi if the capabilities are available. With some businesses, you will get a text message or an email stating that your SIM card has changed and that your number is now connected to a new SIM card. If this happens, you need to take action immediately so you can protect other personal information with your phone number. You first need to call your carrier’s customer service and let them know that these changes were not made by you and that you believe your account has been hacked or your SIM card has been swapped. Since your phone will not have any service from the SIM swapping, you will not be able to make a phone call from your phone. It’s best if you use someone else’s phone or go straight to your carrier’s place of business or store to get it all sorted out. You just need to be sure that this is taken care of as soon as it happens to get it fixed as soon as possible.

To protect yourself and your phone account from being hacked or swapped by someone, there are steps that you can take to limit the scammers options to getting into your account. The first step is asking whoever your wireless and phone provider is to see if there is an option for you to set a PIN to your account. With this PIN or password that you establish, no one but you can make changes to your account and you can be notified if there is any suspicious activity going on. Sometimes, depending on which carrier you use, you are required to set up a PIN number when you sign up for your account, but you should always double check to protect yourself and your information. When making this PIN number or password, make sure that you use something different from other passwords so it is harder for people to hack into or guess. Also, when any accounts direct you to add a two-step verification for your account through your phone number, you should use a second phone number apart from your primary phone number. This will be a separate number apart from the phone number that you use for any accounts that you have. That way the scammer will not have access to more personal information than besides your phone number. There are other apps that you can use outside of your phone number for extra protection on your account such as Google Authenticator or Authy. Be careful about phone calls that request your personal information as these can be a part of those same scams, but just in a different form. You can also limit the amount of personal information you are putting online versus on paper for example and in your own personal files. The bottom line of protecting yourself is to be quick about protecting your information if it happens to ever become compromised.

The issue brought up with SIM swapping and similar scams is how reliant we have become on our phones. With our phones, it has opened doors that lead nowhere as they now act as verification procedures. We moved from just using phones as forms of communications to the means of how we pay for our purchases or where we are storing our personal and private information. While this is convenient in some ways, it is more so dangerous as we leave ourselves exposed to scams and hacking. If customers demand verification outside of their mobile phones and phone numbers, companies and businesses cannot help but listen. The companies can change their verification for passwords, security questions or PIN numbers so that customers can feel better about their information and ultimately feel safer. With other measures for verifying identities and passwords, we can be better protected as consumers and customers.

It is a little sad that we have to go to the levels of protection that we do to ensure safety in our everyday life. If you would have told your great grandparents that in the year 2020 we would have to have two cell phone numbers for security, they would be asking you what a cell phone number is. SIM swapping is a new measure that scammers are going to get any and all of your personal information. By using a PIN number or password to protect your accounts, you can feel better that hackers and scammers will have a harder time trying to get into your account. You need to be one step ahead in protecting yourself and your information with PINs or other verifications outside of just your phone number. The hackers and scammers may be around and lurking and the dark, but let’s be smart and protect our mobile and online identities.